In 2022 people with at least one disability made up an estimated 38% of the United States labor force (between the ages of 16 and 64) according to the Department of Labor, but disability is still often left behind in the broader conversation around diversity, equity and inclusion.

Do your employees or clients with visible and invisible disabilities feel like they belong at all your organization’s meetings and events? From webinars to holiday parties, how does your organization make their inclusion a priority?

Here are four resources we have collected to help you make sure your event is accessible to everyone whether it is in-person or virtual.

Accessible Information Exchange: Meeting on a Level Playing Field by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division

This in-depth resource is a start-to-finish series of guides on the planning and execution of accessible in-person meetings across disabilities. It includes arranging an accessible meeting space, presenting meeting content in an accessible way, providing auxiliary aids, evaluating meeting site accessibility and more. This resource also provides contact information for local technical assistance and accessibility service location around the United States.  Read More…

Planning an Accessible Meeting or Event by EARN (Employer Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion)

Use this list of before, during and after-action items to make your in-person or virtual event successful. The Employer Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion “provides information and resources to help employers, HR professionals and diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA) staff create workplaces that are inclusive of people with disabilities.” Use their event checklist to help you execute all their recommended accessibility best practices. Read More…

How to Handle Captioning & ASL Requests for Virtual Meetings by PEAT (Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology)

Are you hosting a virtual meeting? This article by PEAT guides you through how to make your meeting or event accommodating and accessible for those who are hearing impaired specifically for live caption and American Sign Language (ASL) requests. Learn more about navigating requests, vendors and logistics. Read More…

Communicating Your Commitment to Accessibility: Tips for Employers by PEAT (Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology)

Make sure that you are communicating with all of your audiences about the steps you take to further disability inclusion. PEAT reviews how to communicate with job seekers, new hires, existing employees and the general public. Whether you are an organization of 10 or 10,000, this is key information you will want to distribute. Read More…

The next time you start to add a meeting or event to your calendar – think first, and make sure it’s accessible to everyone. The ability for individuals to participate in their organization’s activities is key for both employee engagement and inclusion. When those with visible or invisible disabilities can participate in meetings and events, it contributes to their sense of belonging and furthers their commitment to their organization.